Working issues

Public services, public goods

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The road to social good ...
New policy guidelines in public services

Today, as corporations expand into new areas, globalisation is taking a new direction. This is not only geographical expansion; corporations are now delving into areas of society previously outside their reach, areas which have traditionally been considered as public services and the public sphere. They are increasing their influence and control over environmental protection, education, culture, public amenities, the health service… The move of public goods into private hands – privatisation - is supported by highly influential international economic organisations, such as the World Bank, the European Union, and especially the World Trade Organisation (WTO).  Read more »

Agriculture, food and development

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Agriculture, food and development

General problem from a contemporary perspective

It is not by accident that this sector of economy is in the focus of the attention of environmental, alterglobalist movements: it is the most ancient human activity, it fulfils basic human needs, and still employs more than half of the world’s population. Moreover, the harmful effects of unsustainable agricultural practices and systems of distribution and consumption have a direct impact on the environment.  Read more »

Segítségnek indult, átok lett belőle

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A globális adósságválság elszenvedői és élvezői

A II. világháború óta a nemzetközi pénzintézetek hiteleznek a szegényebb országoknak, ám ez a „segítség” mára a legtöbb ország számára szűnni nem akaró, egyre növekvő gazdasági terhet jelent.  Read more »

Trade, Fair Trade and Trade Justice

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Gyapotból készül a pamutpóló! Hol itt a bökkenő?

Huszonöt-ezer észak-amerikai gyapottermesztő évi 10.000 USA $ dollár támogatást kap az amerikai kormánytól. Ezzel annyira olcsón tudják a piacon kínálni a gyapotot, hogy az afrikai gyapottermesztők nem tudják terményüket eladni. Burkina Fasóban hittek abban, hogy a gyapottermesztés kisegíti őket a szegénységből, nem fogva tartja.

A gyapottermesztés víz- és vegyszerigényes.  Read more »

WHITHER CAPITALISM? THE CRISIS OF FINANCIALIZATION FROM THE CORE TO THE PERIPHERY

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"....The task is to form a new kind of capitalism with smaller inequalities both globally and within individual societies as well, in which real economy is not subordinated to the financial sector, where SME’s providing job opportunities have access to investment resources just as much as large corporations, where the peripheries are provided real chances for development, and in which more labour-intensive and resource-saving means of production provide solution for unemployment and poverty."

Gábor Scheiring  Read more »

Agriculture and development – a global analysis

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Borbála Sarbu-Simonyi

AGRICULTURE AND DEVELOPMENT

Agriculture and development – a global analysis

On the dawn of the 21st century, about half of the Earth’s six billion inhabitants are living in poverty, on 2 dollars a day. Deep poverty is accompanied by chronic hunger as well as famines incurring in the wake of wars and natural catastrophes.  Read more »

Energy and Climate

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Energy and Climate
Jan Dolezal

There is now a strong consensus that climate change presents an urgent challenge to the well-being of all countries, particularly the poorest countries and the poorest people in them. It epitomizes the complexity of the development challenge in a globalizing but still highly unequal world. It magnifies growing concerns about food security, water scarcity and energy security. It is a daunting environmental threat that raises the most difficult issues of economic disparity, political power, and social justice. The primary direct effects of climate change are an increase in droughts and floods, more seasonal peaks in river flow and a higher probability of stronger tropical storms. The poorest countries and communities are likely to suffer the most because of their geographical location, low incomes and low institutional capacity as well as their greater reliance on climate-sensitive sectors like agriculture. This could lead to population displacement, migration, and potential conflicts. In the longer term, sea level rise and glacier melting threaten the existence of nations and the development foundation of sub-continents.  Read more »

Local food systems through the lens of the food crisis

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The food crisis of 2007-2008, affecting over forty countries worldwide, acted as a wake up call. It reminded the international community that – in accordance with the founding principles of food sovereignty- thriving localized food systems are essential in ensuring the food security of local populations in the face of severe food supply shocks.  Read more »

HUNGARIAN INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT COOPERATION: PROBLEMS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

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This paper provides a brief overview of Hungarian international development cooperation (IDC). After a short introduction into the history, legal context, institutional setup and the system of bi- and multilateral Hungarian development cooperation the main weaknesses and possible solutions are discussed. The main problems include the lack of sufficient funding (worsened by the practice of aid inflation), aid ineffectiveness, a weak legal and institutional background and the lack of coherence between different policy areas affecting poverty.  Read more »

Democratisation, development, civil society

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Democratisation, development, civil society
Zsolt Boda

We are going to examine the connections between the three concepts. First we make an attempt at interpreting the relationship between democracy and development, and quickly look at the arguments which are based on the assumption that there is some cause and effect relationship between the two. The basic question is, of course, which definition of democracy or development we take as a starting point. For a start, we accept that development is one with economic growth, but the next step is to discuss development as a more complex social phenomenon – this, of course, will have consequences on the question of its relationship with democracy. In a normative approach we can safely argue that democracy itself is part of the concept of social development and in this case it does not make sense to look for cause and effect relationships between the two phenomena.  Read more »